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The Walter Edgecomb House

This handsome house features a wide front porch, Palladian window and heavy Georgian era trim elements. The larger elements under the roofline are called modillions and the smaller elements below are called dentils. Note the fluted corner pilasters (often called cornerboards). Interior detailing carries the outside mouldings in, and the use of arched doorways would…

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The Sarah Taylor House II

Period homes often found formality and symmetry on more than one side, as illustrated by this house with its two “front” entries. The main photo of this house is actually the back of the house featuring an entry that borrows some of its detailing from the classical Greek orders, while the front entry with full…

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The McClellan Farmhouse

This simple late Georgian colonial is an example of New England vernacular homes built in the late 1700s. Chimneys were large and centrally located in the home. Windows had small panes of glass and roofs were protected by wooden shingles. Front doorways were the one element often embellished in these early homes.

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The Martha Kimball House

This Saltbox reproduction home, built in 1999, has the distinctive “saltbox” roof that has its roots in the 14th century English “catslide” roofs, which were extensions of existing houses. American “saltbox” roofs were usually, but not always, a result of adding a one-story shed to the back of the house and then extending the roof…

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The Luella Gregory House II

A slight variation on the original home, this house has been built in both Quechee, Vermont and New London, New Hampshire. Photos of all three variations can be seen on this page and it is interesting to note how different they all are, even though they share the same floor plan.

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The Luella Gregory House

The iconic white farmhouses that dot our New England landscape are usually Greek revival in origin. White was almost always the color of choice to mimic the color of the cut marble used by the ancient Greeks. It is interesting to note that many of today’s architectural review committees do not consider white a “natural”…

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The Kate Banneker House

This house is inspired by the Shingle style made popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Shingle style homes were a backlash against fussy ornamentation of the Victorian period and were instead designed to blend into their landscape. Shingle style homes used the abundance of locally available wood in its natural colors and informal…

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The Joseph Abercrombie House

The Joseph Abercrombie House includes characteristics of several early architectural styles. The main mass of the front is Greek revival. Note the heavy corner boards and the wide frieze under the roofline. The back elevation is Cape like, with three dormers. The barn connector and the bedroom wing and porches perhaps were added over time…

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The Jeremiah Lee House

Although most people don’t think of this story and a half house as Greek revival, its wide, simple frieze, supported by heavy pilaster corners, and Greek order entry are all important elements of the Greek revival style. The style reached its heyday just prior to the Civil War, but continued to evolve in later styles.…

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The Hesther Burr House

The Hesther Burr House is an example of formal Greek revival style and was based on studying similar Greek revival forms in upstate New York. This home, located in southern Virginia, can also be seen on our 9-day Greek revival video. The framing and exterior trim was installed with a 10-man crew in 9 days…

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